Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Why didn't Genghis Khan recruit teenaged Gwok Jing into the Mongol army?

  1. #1
    Moderator Ken Cheng's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    22,966

    Default Why didn't Genghis Khan recruit teenaged Gwok Jing into the Mongol army?

    Genghis Khan always held Gwok Jing in high regard, even when the latter was just a young man. The Khan knew that Gwok Jing was a capable archer, a formidable martial artist (compared to his regular soldiers), and a loyal follower. Even so, until late in LOCH, when Genghis appointed Gwok Jing as a general in the Mongol forces, the Khan never recruited Gwok Jing into the army. Why not? It couldn't be out of respect for the wishes of Gwok Jing's mother and the Gong Nam 7 Freaks, could it? In Gwok Jing, Genghis Khan would have had a valuable soldier in the unification wars against the Kereit tribes, but Gwok Jing remained a civilian throughout his formative years on the Mongolian steppes.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,976

    Default

    Other things took precedent over the army. The first of these being the duel with Yang Kang that the Freaks and Qiu Chuji had agreed on 18 years earlier. There was also the matter of avenging Guo Jing's father's death. Since Guo Jing was returning to the Central Plains, Genghis gave him a mission that he could try and fulfill along the way - killing Wanyan Honglie, as revenge for leading Jamuka astray (blaming an outsider saved him from having to recognise his own part in the breakup with his anda).

    When Guo Jing eventually returned to the steppes, with the duel out of the way, Genghis immediately made him an army commander.

  3. #3
    Moderator Ken Cheng's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    22,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pannonian View Post
    Other things took precedent over the army. The first of these being the duel with Yang Kang that the Freaks and Qiu Chuji had agreed on 18 years earlier.
    I'm surprised that the Khan was willing to take that into consideration. Here was a highly valuable potential soldier in his camp, but the Khan would essentially have to lose this soldier's services for a few years (or forever, if Gwok Jing were killed along the way) for a personal matter that had nothing to do with the Khan's plans.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,976

    Default

    Guo Jing wouldn't have been a willing participant if Genghis had forced him into the army, and Genghis had something else that Guo Jing could do while he was away.

  5. #5
    Moderator Ken Cheng's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    22,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pannonian View Post
    Guo Jing wouldn't have been a willing participant if Genghis had forced him into the army
    I thought the expectation was that any able-bodied young male who lived within the borders of Genghis' empire was subject to compulsory military service when he reached a certain age, particularly if he has already exhibited some penchant for the fighting arts.

    and Genghis had something else that Guo Jing could do while he was away.
    True. To use a modern day analogy, Genghis saw greater value in using Gwok Jing as a special ops soldier going alone deep into enemy territory to carry out a decapitation attack against the enemy leader than in using him as a standard infantryman or cavalryman on the front lines.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Cheng View Post
    True. To use a modern day analogy, Genghis saw greater value in using Gwok Jing as a special ops soldier going alone deep into enemy territory to carry out a decapitation attack against the enemy leader than in using him as a standard infantryman or cavalryman on the front lines.
    From LOCH chapter 6:

    “Well,” Temujin said. “Since you go to the south, will you bring back
    the head of the Sixth Jin Prince, Wanyan Honglie, for me? My sworn
    brother Jamuka betrayed me and lost his life, and it’s the fault of that
    scum. How many men do you need to achieve this mission?”

    ...

    Throughout his childhood, Guo Jing’s mother had told him stories about
    the past and he had developed a great hatred towards the Jin. This was
    reinforced by his battle with the ‘Four Demons of the Yellow River’ who
    were employed by Wanyan Honglie. Thinking of an answer to Genghis Khan’s
    question, he said to himself, “If my six Shifus will lend me a hand,
    certainly my mission will be a success. If I take along brave soldiers
    who do not know martial arts, they are likely to be a hindrance.” He
    then answered, “If my six Shifus accompany me, I won’t need anybody else.”

    ...

    Guo Jing agreed. The Khan gave him ten taels of gold for his journey and
    offered the Six Freaks a part of the spoils plundered from Ong Khan.
    Learning that he was to leave on a mission to the south, all of Guo
    Jing’s Mongol friends also offered gifts to him.
    Of course, those expenses didn't long survive an encounter with a certain beggar boy.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 38
    Last Post: 12-23-10, 04:18 AM
  2. Mongol - The Untold Story of Genghis Khan
    By Suet Seung in forum Movies
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-20-09, 03:16 AM
  3. Genghis Khan: were there warning signs for Gwok Jing?
    By Ken Cheng in forum Wuxia Fiction
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-19-08, 01:55 PM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-19-07, 06:16 AM
  5. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-01-06, 03:53 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •