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Thread: Do you insist on original, definitive recorded versions?

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    Moderator Ken Cheng's Avatar
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    Default Do you insist on original, definitive recorded versions?

    When it comes to recordings of your favorite songs, do you insist on the original, most widely known and distributed studio-recorded versions (i.e. the definitive, historic versions), or does it really not matter to you? Are you equally happy with a live version (provided it's good) or even a later re-recording of the song by the original artist?

    I tend to insist on original studio versions myself, unless a live version becomes definitive (i.e. the live version of Cheap Trick's "I Want You to Want Me" or Peter Frampton's "Baby I Love Your Way").

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    atlantean0208
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Cheng View Post
    When it comes to recordings of your favorite songs, do you insist on the original, most widely known and distributed studio-recorded versions (i.e. the definitive, historic versions), or does it really not matter to you? Are you equally happy with a live version (provided it's good) or even a later re-recording of the song by the original artist?

    I tend to insist on original studio versions myself, unless a live version becomes definitive (i.e. the live version of Cheap Trick's "I Want You to Want Me" or Peter Frampton's "Baby I Love Your Way").
    Is this a trick question or what , it's sound fishy .

    Ok seriously, for me it's all back to how good the song when I hear it, so it doesn't matter to me if it sang by the original singer or a new one. As long as it's good to the ear, then I'm ok.
    Last edited by atlantean0208; 10-28-08 at 01:30 AM.

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    Moderator Ken Cheng's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atlantean0208 View Post
    Ok seriously, for me it's all back to how good the song when I hear it, so it doesn't matter to me if it sang by the original singer or a new one. As long as it's good to the ear, then I'm ok.
    For me, I tend to insist not only on the original artist, but the *original* hit recording...the version that is definitive to the world at large. Live versions are all right as long as they're so noted, but they're no replacement for the original. What's even worse are later re-recordings of the song by the original artist. This is especially true for older hits. Those old classics don't sound right with modern instrumental backings and recording techniques.

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    The live version usually needs knowledge of the studio version in order to work, as the melody line is often less clear live than in the studio. However, live versions can add something that the more sanitised studio version doesn't have. Eg. the album version of Portishead's Sour Times is controlled, and sets the mood the artists intended. However, in a live version I've heard, the performance is much untidier, until the end where the singer unravels and screams herself hoarse. If one hadn't heard the studio version before, one might think wtf, and the song may hit the mark for some and miss horribly for others. But with knowlege of the studio original, that live version was IMHO much better and more expressive of the song.

    Portishead - Sour Times (album)
    Portishead - Sour Times (live)

    Here's a live version that's close to the album version in style.

    This remix is also fun.
    Last edited by pannonian; 10-28-08 at 08:50 AM.

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    Senior Member Azn Dude's Avatar
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    It depends on the song for me. Some times the live show are better, with a better solo or just more energy. What I really like to seek is the the demo tapes, I really enjoy hearing a song evolve from its early stages to the final.
    After Hours - Velvet Underground

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    Senior Member Guo Xiang's Avatar
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    I go for whichever sounds the best, be it live or not.
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    Senior Member Canuck21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Cheng View Post
    When it comes to recordings of your favorite songs, do you insist on the original, most widely known and distributed studio-recorded versions (i.e. the definitive, historic versions), or does it really not matter to you? Are you equally happy with a live version (provided it's good) or even a later re-recording of the song by the original artist?

    I tend to insist on original studio versions myself, unless a live version becomes definitive (i.e. the live version of Cheap Trick's "I Want You to Want Me" or Peter Frampton's "Baby I Love Your Way").
    What about studio versions produced the same year or different versions for the single release and the album release? Which version should be considered the definitive one?
    My obsessions: Joy Division, New Order, Bones, The Office.

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    Moderator Ken Cheng's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canuck21 View Post
    What about studio versions produced the same year or different versions for the single release and the album release? Which version should be considered the definitive one?
    That's a good question. Sometimes, a single will be mixed a little differently from an album track, and depending on the region of distribution, the mixes could be a little different too.

    I'd go for the most widely distributed, best known, most played version myself.

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    Senior Member Canuck21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Batman View Post
    When it comes to recordings of your favorite songs, do you insist on the original, most widely known and distributed studio-recorded versions (i.e. the definitive, historic versions), or does it really not matter to you? Are you equally happy with a live version (provided it's good) or even a later re-recording of the song by the original artist?
    It really doesn't matter to me, whichever sounds better is fine by me.

    Ceremony (Tour Rehearsal Session)
    Ceremony (Final concert at High Hall, Birmingham University, Manchester, May 2, 1980)
    Ceremony (7" version)
    Ceremony (12" version)
    Ceremony (Live Estoc De Pop, Barcelona, 7-7-1984)

    Ceremony was originally written and composed by Joy Division, but never released by them because the lead singer Ian Curtis died before the band ever did a proper studio recording. Only two Joy Division recordings in existence are known and both are incomplete and of low quality since one is a rehearsal session and the other was recorded during their last gig. In 1981, New Order officially released a 7" and a 12". To Ian Curtis fans, only the Joy Division versions are the good ones, but my favourite version is hands down the 7". I also particularly like New Order's live performance in Barcelona, 1984. It's like Ceremony on speed. It's random, spontaneous, even raw, just how I like New Order. Those who want a studio sound should stay clear.

    Interzone (RCA Unreleased Album Session)

    Interzone (Album version)

    I prefer the album version of Interzone, but the barking in the RCA version is interesting. Interzone is most exciting live though, too bad I couldn't find a clip of it anywhere.

    Shadowplay (RCA Unreleased Album Session)
    Shadowplay (Granada TV performance)
    Shadowplay (Album version)

    The most heard version by non-Joy Division fans is probably the Granada TV performance because most first heard Shadowplay through YouTube and the TV performance is the most viewed. The definitive version though is the album version.

    She's Lost Control (Album version)

    She's Lost Control (12" version)
    She's Lost Control (Peel Session)
    She's Lost Control (BBC performance)

    The album version and the 12" version of She's Lost Control are equally popular among fans. I personally like all versions.

    Love Will Tear Us Apart (Single version)

    Love Will Tear Us Apart (Peel Session)

    The definitive version and the most heard of Love Will Tear Us Apart is the single version, but I like both. Sometime I feel like something more upbeat so I listen to the Peel Session instead.

    Temptation (12" version)
    Temptation (Riverside TV performance)
    Temptation (Substance version)
    Temptation (Electronic Ecstacy version - Montreux Jazz Festival 1993)
    Temptation '98

    I freaking love Temptation and like all versions. Purists will prefer the 12", the original version, but I have a soft spot for the Substance version because the vocal and the music sound very "alternative". I don't know how to explain it, but it's something that is melodic, yet cannot be pop. Bernard Sumner's voice here is what I consider the best representation of alternative music.

    Your Silent Face (Album version)

    Your Silent Face (BBC Radio 1 Live in Concert)

    Your Silent Face, one of the rare New Order songs that sound better live.

    Sub-culture (Album version)
    Sub-culture (7" version)

    The 7" is the most heard and most popular version of Sub-culture, but I hate it because I can't stand the female backing vocal; I find it so cheesy. I much prefer the album version with just Barney's vocal. It's plain and it's better like that.
    My obsessions: Joy Division, New Order, Bones, The Office.

    Do bears bear? Do bees bee?

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    Senior Member Canuck21's Avatar
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    Killing An Arab (Album version)
    Killing An Arab (Live)
    Killing An Arab (Live - The Cure In Orange)
    Killing an Arab (Live 1984)

    First of all, Killing an Arab is not a racist song in case some of you are wondering. The song is based on a book titled The Stranger by Albert Camus. This is the perfect example of a song that sounds much better live the majority of the time. Live, it has much more punch, the "original" pales in comparison.
    Last edited by Canuck21; 03-06-09 at 01:12 AM.
    My obsessions: Joy Division, New Order, Bones, The Office.

    Do bears bear? Do bees bee?

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