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Thread: The Legendary Bruce Lee

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    Thumbs up The Legendary Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee was borned in Novemner 27, 1940 in San Franciso of California in USA. A son of Hoi-Cheun Lee(father) and Grace Lee(mother)

    Name: Bruce Lee
    Birth Name: Lee Jun Fan also known as Lee Siu Lung (the little dragon)
    Height: 5' 7"
    Body type: Slim/ Slender
    Sex: M
    Nationality: American
    Birth Date: November 27, 1940
    Birth Place: San Francisco, California, USA
    Profession: actor, director, writer
    Education: University of Washington (majored in Philosophy)
    Place of Death: Hong Kong
    Deathe Date: July 20, 1973.
    Death Cause: brain edema
    Husband/Wife: Linda Lee Caldwell (writer; born in 1945; married on August 17, 1964)
    Father: Hoi-Cheun Lee (actor; died in 1965)
    Mother: Grace Lee
    Sister: Phoebe Lee (born in 1938), and Agnes Lee
    Brother: Robert Lee (musician, businessman; younger) and Peter Lee (older)
    Son: Brandon Lee (actor; born on February 1, 1965; died following shooting accident in the filming of the Crow on March 31, 1993)
    Daughter: Shannon Lee (actress; born on April 19, 1969)
    Claim to fame: as Lee in Enter The Dragon (1973)


    source: http://www.celebritywonder.com/html/brucelee.html
    Last edited by lightanddark; 06-20-07 at 04:34 PM.

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    Bruce Lee's galleries:
    http://www.celebritywonder.com/html/..._gallery1.html
    there a lot of pictures. Please visit.

    Bruce Lee's Posters:
    http://www.celebritywonder.com/poster/Bruce_Lee.html

    Bruce Lee's videos:
    http://www.celebritywonder.com/vids/Bruce_Lee/
    great videos of him!

    Bruce Lee's Poll
    http://www.celebritywonder.com/html/brucelee_vote1.html

    Bruce Lee's Bio
    http://www.celebritywonder.com/html/brucelee_bio1.html

    Bruce Lee's websites==I know there are more, but I just find some of this.
    http://www.spacesurfer.com/mceleb/list/Bruce_Lee_0.html great site





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    Source:
    Bruce Lee's Video:
    http://www.celebritywonder.com/html/...ee_video1.html

    His Movies:
    2002--The Art of Action: Martial Arts in Motion Picture
    1998--The Path of the Dragon --->my liking
    1981--Game of Death II --->my linking
    1980--Fist of Fear
    1978--Game of Death ---> My favorite also.
    1977--Bruce Lee, the Legend
    1976--Fury of the Dragon
    1973--Enter the Dragon ---> My favorite
    1972--Revenge of the Dragon
    1972--The Chinese Connection
    1972-- Bruce Lee and I
    1971--Fists of Fury --->I like this, too.
    1971-- Longstreet (TV)
    1969--Marlowe
    1966--The Green Hornet (TV Series) ---> He begin to be well known/famous in both U.S and Hong Kong. He used his real martial arts to fight in this movie.
    1960--The Orphan
    1957--The Thunderstorm
    1956--Zao zhi dang cu wo bu jia
    1959--Zha dian na fu
    1955--We Owe It to Our Children
    1955--Love Part 2
    1955--Gu er xing -
    1955--Gu xing xue lei
    1953--A Mother's Tears
    1953--The Guiding Light
    1953--It's Father's Fault
    1953--Qian wan ren jia
    1953--In the Face of Demolition
    1951--Infancy
    1950--My Son, Ah Chung
    1949--Sai See in the Dream
    1948--Wealth Is Like a Dream
    1946--The Birth of Mankind
    1941--Golden Gate Girl


    Last edited by lightanddark; 06-20-07 at 06:46 PM.

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up Bruce Lee's In-Dept Biogrpahy

    Source: http://www.who2.com/brucelee.html great site

    Bruce Lee is the granddaddy of high-kicking, fist-fighting movie martial artists. He got his start in America as Kato, the sidekick in the jokey 1960's TV series The Green Hornet. Later he went to Hong Kong and more or less founded the institution of kung fu movies. Wiry and charismatic, Lee reached a pinnacle in 1973 with Enter The Dragon. His untimely death before the film's release helped make him an enduring cult figure. Other films include Way of the Dragon (1972), The Big Boss (1971) and Marlowe (1969, with James Garner)
    ================================================== ================================================== ========
    Awards
    source: http://us.imdb.com/name/nm0000045/awards
    Bruce Lee's award "Star on the Walk of Fame" in Motion Picture
    At 6933 Hollywood Blvd.
    ================================================== ================================================== =========
    Great sites:
    http://us.imdb.com/name/nm0000045/ his movies
    http://www.kungfucinema.com/reviews/enterthedragon.htm "Enter the Dragon"

    ================================================== ================================================== ================
    http://www.biography.com/search/article.do?id=9542095 his in-dept biography

    Actor, martial arts expert. Born Lee Jun Fan(Bruce Lee's birthname), on November 27, 1940, in San Francisco, California. His father(Hoi-Cheun Lee an actor;died in 1965), a Hong Kong opera singer, moved with his wife and three children to the United States in 1939; his fourth child(Bruce Lee), a son, was born while he was on tour in San Francisco. Lee’s mother(Grace Lee) called him “Bruce,” which means “strong one” in Gaelic. Young Bruce appeared in his first film at the age of three months, when he served as the stand-in for an American baby in Golden Gate Girl(1941).

    In 1941, the Lees moved back to Hong Kong, then occupied by the Japanese. Apparently a natural in front of the camera, Bruce Lee appeared in roughly 20 films as a child actor, beginning in 1946. He also studied dance, once winning a cha-cha competition. As a teenager, he became a member of a Hong Kong street gang, and in 1953 began studying kung fu to sharpen his fighting skills. In 1959, after Lee got into trouble with the police for fighting, his mother sent him back to the U.S. to live with family friends outside Seattle, Washington.

    Lee finished high school in Edison, Washington, and subsequently enrolled as a philosophy major at the University of Washington. He also got a job teaching the Wing Chun style of martial arts that he had learned in Hong Kong to his fellow students and others. Through his teaching, Lee met Linda Emery, whom he married in 1964. By that time, Lee had opened his own martial arts school in Seattle. He and Linda soon moved to California, where Lee opened two more schools in Los Angeles and Oakland. At his schools, Lee taught mostly a style he called Jeet Kune Do.

    Lee gained a measure of celebrity with his role in the television series The Green Hornet, which aired from 1966 to 1967. In the show, which was based on a 1930s radio program, the small, wiry Lee displayed his acrobatic and theatrical fighting style as the Hornet’s loyal sidekick, Kato. He went on to make guest appearances in such TV shows as Ironside and Longstreet, while his most notable role came in the 1969 film Marlowe, starring James Garner. Confronted with the dearth of meaty roles and the prevalence of stereotypes regarding actors of Asian heritage, Lee left Los Angeles for Hong Kong in 1971, with his wife and two children (Brandon, born in 1965, and Shannon, born in 1967).

    Back in the city where he had grown up, Lee signed a two-film contract. Fists of Fury (its U.S. title) was released in late 1971, featuring Lee as a vengeful fighter chasing the villains who had killed his kung-fu master. Combining his smooth Jeet Kune Do athleticism with the high-energy theatrics of his performance in The Green Hornet, Lee was the charismatic center of the film, which set new box office records in Hong Kong. Those records were broken by Lee’s next film, The Chinese Connection (1972), which, like Fists of Fury, received poor reviews from critics when they were released in the U.S.

    By the end of 1972, Lee was a major movie star in Asia. He had founded his own production company, Concord Pictures, and had released his first directorial feature, Way of the Dragon. Though he had not yet gained stardom in America, he was poised on the brink with his second directorial feature and first major Hollywood project, Enter the Dragon.

    On July 20, 1973, just one month before the premiere of Enter the Dragon, Bruce Lee died in Hong Kong at the age of 33. The official cause of his sudden and utterly unexpected death was a brain edema, found in an autopsy to have been caused by a strange reaction to a prescription painkiller he was reportedly taking for a back injury. Controversy surrounded Lee’s death from the beginning, as some claimed he had been murdered. He was also widely believed to have been cursed, a conclusion driven by Lee’s obsession with his own early death. (The tragedy of the so-called curse was compounded in 1993, when Brandon Lee was killed under similarly mysterious circumstances during the filming of The Crow. The 28-year-old actor was fatally shot with a gun that supposedly contained blanks but somehow had a live round lodged deep within its barrel.)
    With the posthumous release of Enter the Dragon, Lee’s status as a film icon was confirmed. The film went on to gross a total of over $200 million, and Lee’s legacy created a whole new breed of action hero—a mold filled with varying degrees of success by such actors as Chuck Norris, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Steven Seagal, and Jackie Chan.

  5. #5
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    Thumbs up Bruce Lee's series!

    Jing Wu Men (1972)

    He looks so AWESOME!!--> My favorite picture of him.



    Tang Shan Da Xiong (1971)



    The Green Hornet (TV Series) --1966


    Bruce Lee is the thing guy behind of Van Williams


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    1973--Enter the Dragon ---> My favorite

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=QQORnYPqU3A Enter The Dragon - Highlights= 9:45min
    you Can watch this wonderful actionS in this video clip. It's very funny at the beginning when Bruce Lee talking to the little kid.

    WOW....he REALLY KNOW how to FIGHT WELL!!!








    Last edited by lightanddark; 06-20-07 at 04:45 PM.

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    Default Continue "Enter the Drage 1973"

    Continue "Enter the Drage 1973"








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    Continue "Enter the Drage 1973"









    It's funny when he hitting the boy's head for not listenning to him

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    Cont. "Enter the Dragon 1973"



    I love his face's action! It's like he's "the one"....well...he's THE ONE.

    He's Funny !




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    Bruce Lee vs. Japanese School

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=5q9kYKtvYU0 Bruce Lee VS japanese school 6:08min
    It's awesome to see he fight.







    Last edited by lightanddark; 06-20-07 at 05:15 PM.

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    Source: http://www.time.com/time/time100/her...ile/lee01.html


    Bruce Lee in a scence from the 1973 filem "Enter the Dragon", completed shortly before the martial star's death of brain edema.

    Bruce Lee
    "With nothing but his hands, feet and a lot of attitude, he turned the little guy into a tough guy"
    By JOEL STEIN

    Monday, June 14, 1999
    Not a good century for the Chinese. After dominating much of the past two millenniums in science and philosophy, they've spent the past 100 years being invaded, split apart and patronizingly lectured by the West. And, let's face it, this communism thing isn't working out either.

    But in 1959 a short, skinny, bespectacled 18-year-old kid from Hong Kong traveled to America and declared himself to be John Wayne, James Dean, Charles Atlas and the guy who kicked your butt in junior high. In an America where the Chinese were still stereotyped as meek house servants and railroad workers, Bruce Lee was all steely sinew, threatening stare and cocky, pointed finger — a Clark Kent who didn't need to change outfits. He was the redeemer, not only for the Chinese but for all the geeks and dorks and pimpled teenage masses that washed up at the theaters to see his action movies. He was David, with spin-kicks and flying leaps more captivating than any slingshot

    He is the patron saint of the cult of the body: the almost mystical belief that we have the power to overcome adversity if only we submit to the right combinations of exercise, diet, meditation and weight training; that by force of will, we can sculpt ourselves into demigods. The century began with a crazy burst of that philosophy. In 1900 the Boxer rebels of China who attacked the Western embassies in Beijing thought that martial-arts training made them immune to bullets. It didn't. But a related fanaticism — on this side of sanity — exists today: the belief that the body can be primed for killer perfection and immortal endurance.

    Lee never looked like Arnold Schwarzenegger or achieved immortality. He died at 32 under a cloud of controversy, in his mistress's home, of a brain edema, which an autopsy said was caused by a strange reaction to a prescription painkiller called Equagesic. At that point, he had starred in only three released movies, one of which was unwatchably bad, the other two of which were watchably bad. Although he was a popular movie star in Asia, his New York Times obit ran only eight sentences, one of which read "Vincent Canby, the film critic of the New York Times, said that movies like Fists of Fury make 'the worst Italian western look like the most solemn and noble achievements of the early Soviet Cinema.'"


    What Canby missed is that it's the moments between the plot points that are worth watching. It was the ballet of precision violence that flew off the screen; every combination you can create in Mortal Kombat can be found in a Lee movie. And even with all the special-effects money that went into "The Matrix," no one could make violence as beautiful as Lee's. He had a cockiness that passed for charisma. And when he whooped like a crane, jumped in the air and simultaneously kicked two bad guys into unconsciousness, all while punching out two others mostly offscreen, you knew the real Lee could do that too.
    He spent his life turning his small body into a large weapon. Born sickly in a San Francisco hospital (his father, a Hong Kong opera singer, was on tour there), he would be burdened with two stigmas that don't become an action hero: an undescended testicle and a female name, Li Jun Fan, which his mother gave him to ward off the evil spirits out to snatch valuable male children. She even pierced one of his ears, because evil spirits always fall for the pierced-ear trick. Lee quickly became obsessed with martial arts and body building and not much else. As a child actor back in Hong Kong, Lee appeared in 20 movies and rarely in school. He was part of a small gang that was big enough to cause his mother to ship him to America before his 18th birthday so he could claim his dual-citizenship and avoid winding up in jail. Boarding at a family friend's Chinese restaurant in Seattle, Lee got a job teaching the Wing Chun style of martial arts that he had learned in Hong Kong. In 1964, at a tournament in Long Beach, Calif. — the first major American demonstration of kung fu — Lee, an unknown, ripped through black belt Dan Inosanto so quickly that Inosanto asked to be his student.

    Shortly after, Lee landed his first U.S. show-biz role: Kato in The Green Hornet, a 1966-67 TV superhero drama from the creators of Batman. With this minor celebrity, he attracted students like Steve McQueen, James Coburn and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar to a martial art he called Jeet Kune Do, "the way of the intercepting fist." Living in L.A., he became the vanguard on all things '70s. He was a physical-fitness freak: running, lifting weights and experimenting with isometrics and electrical impulses meant to stimulate his muscles while he slept. He took vitamins, ginseng, royal jelly, steroids and even liquid steaks. A rebel, he flouted the Boxer-era tradition of not teaching kung fu to Westerners even as he hippily railed against the robotic exercises of other martial arts that prevented self-expressive violence. One of his admonitions: "Research your own experiences for the truth. Absorb what is useful...Add what is specifically your own...The creating individual...is more important than any style or system." When he died, doctors found traces of marijuana in his body. They could have saved some money on the autopsy and just read those words.


    Despite his readiness to embrace American individuality and culture, Lee couldn't get Hollywood to embrace him, so he returned to Hong Kong to make films. In these films, Lee chose to represent the little guy, though he was a very cocky little guy. And so, in his movies, he'd fight for the Chinese against the invading Japanese or the small-town family against the city-living drug dealers. There were, for some reason, usually about 100 of these enemies, but they mostly died as soon as he punched them in the face. The plots were uniform: Lee makes a vow not to fight; people close to Lee are exploited and killed; Lee kills lots of people in retaliation; Lee turns himself in for punishment.

    The films set box-office records in Asia, and so Hollywood finally gave him the American action movie he longed to make. But Lee died a month before the release of his first U.S. film, Enter the Dragon. The movie would make more than $200 million, and college kids would pin Lee posters next to Che Guevara's. In the end, Lee could only exist young and in the movies. Briefly, he burst out against greater powers before giving himself over to the authorities. A star turn in a century not good for the Chinese.

    Joel Stein is a columnist and staff writer for TIME magazine

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    His book about his life It sold in Amazon.com


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    Bruce Lee vs. Japanese School

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=5q9kYKtvYU0 Bruce Lee VS japanese school 6:08min
    It's awesome to see he fight.





    Last edited by lightanddark; 06-20-07 at 05:16 PM.

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    His Galleries






    He(born 1940) and His Wife(Linda Lee Caldwell-she was a writer, born in 1945)
    They married on August 17, 1964; he's 5 year older than her, which I think it's a good gap for a marriage couple.



    They're a CUTE couple.

    They with their son, Brandon Bruce Lee born on February 1, 1965.

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    Bruce Lee appeared on front of camera when he's still very young(3 months from his birthday)

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=RAyHrMQcqD0 In loving memory of Bruce Lee: the little dragon 5:15min



    How CUTE is he, the little boy!!!


    He look goregously pretty, isn't he???? Anyone agree with me?

    Acutally he look very handsome and talented as well. He knows martial arts where as other actors don't. Now where can we find the 2nd Bruce Lee(after his son died)???

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    Continue Bruce Lee vs. Japanese School

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=5q9kYKtvYU0 Bruce Lee VS japanese school 6:08min
    It's awesome to see he fight.







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    Continue Bruce Lee vs. Japanese School





    I Love when he flying in the air, look very real, natural, and most realistic.




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    Continue Bruce Lee vs. Japanese School

    He give out very hard punch.


    It's quite funny to see that fat guy being kicked by him

    He's done fighting for now .

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    cont. Bruce Lee vs. Japanese School










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